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administrator. sean o'keefe has been acting administrator of the navy. if you have a person is qualified, historians will tell you. i love my work and i think my people enjoy working for me. my job is to facilitate their success we want to be the best place work in government. c-span: you mentioned having dinner in iraq and afghanistan. he is now an oscar nod. where is he at now? >> guest: is a navy s.e.a.l. c-span: how did that happen? >> guest: he wanted to be an astronaut. they come from all walks of life. i apply for the state program and i was picked up and i went all the way through a 14 year career where nasa reimburse me for my salary. in the marine corps let me go for 14 years and i went back. c-span: so what does the space station do? >> guest: most of it is science, scientific investigation. solar science, we now have a number of earth science experiments that are there looking up the atmosphere. we are doing technology development that is the product of many nations, more than 20 nations that have the science experiment. it is a basic physics experiment looking at the beginni
we'd all like to see right now. >> thanks for that. from the audience. >> hi, my name is sean lingus, i'm a reporter. my question is for mr. blizard and anyone else who wants to answer. it's been sate with regard to isac there aren't enough clearances in the industry for everyone who wants to participate. does nerc acknowledge this is a problem and, if so, what's being done to address it? >> sean, thanks for the question. we, industry recognized that we needed to get security clearances out to those that really need it, so then you do the simple math. i want to say there's 4,000 entityies, and you come up with a model that maybe three or four clearances are needed per entity. you do the math, it's just simply not achievable with the budget constraints, the handling of that many background investigations, etc., etc. so who really should get those clearances? well, the cip committee, the technical committee that reports directly to the board of directors, tackled this problem about the last eight months. we formed a task force, and we built a product. that's one of the reports that's g
headquarters that has been uttered a few times, and sean joyce is here and has heard it once or twice, the deputy of the leaders need to know how to delegate and that is something that happens from time to time. thank you for those lessons because i've learned the benefits of doing that. so a couple of brief points to wrap up. as you and anne start traveling without your 60 detail there's a couple of words you need to know there will be important to you, and that is the tsa recheck. [laughter] trust me on this one. >> now you know why you were invited. >> that's right. there you go. and so finally, on behalf of all of the men and women at the fbi who's had the privilege, and the honor of serving with mr. director bob mueller these last 12 years, let me express a found appreciation and gratitude for what you have done guiding the bureau through a tumultuous time with integrity and distinction, and on a personal note to say thanks for the privilege of serving as one of your deputy director's for encouraging me at teaching me lessons in leadership which i have had the opportunity to use.
sean, a reporter with sharp grid today. it's been said that with regards to isac there are not enough security clearances for everyone who wants to participate. it's acknowledged this is a problem and what is being done to address it. >> thanks for the question. the industry recognized we needed to get security clearances out to those that really need it. so then you do the simple math, and i want to say there's 4,000 entities and to come up with a model that may be three or four clearances are needed for entities. do the math, it's just simply not achievable with the budget constraints, the handling of that many background investigations, et cetera, et cetera. so, who really should get those clearances? well, the technical committee that reports directly to the board of directors, tackled this problem for the last eight months. they formed a task force and we built a product. that's one of the reports going to the board here next week, and if it's approved, accepted, by the board, it will become public. that is one model for the clearance issue. and i look forward to getting that in
, thank you. >> sean phillips with the m a. have a question about transparency, we are seeing more articles in the new york times recently how expensive a sailing trip can be, where one provider will charge $500 and another one charges only $100. these are things that will be difficult for consumers to see, that line item might not be easily broken out, might not see it at all. as you mention it, consumers read through their packages, the package provided by the employer to the employee, not the provider. as you said it gets very complex and some of these fees will not be there. it will be hard for the employee to control their costs. how are the employers going to help the employees with that? >> the good news is most of the health plans now including united and cigna, anthem, a number of health plans on the leading edge have apps, applications that allow people to know a couple things and some third parties like compare health and others. this is a fast-moving field. whether an employee or consumer or patient needs to know, what is it going to cost them? even the data on charges,
is sean and i'm a reporter with federal times a publication that covers the federal agencies so we do a lot of agencies. tony i completely agree with you with what you said about -- i would also have their agencies that will not deal with reporters on any basis except e-mail. as an employee you probably know -- >> it drives me crazy. >> a treasury employer doesn't check her messages. send her an e-mail. to get to my question though one frustration i found in covering the government is a lot of pao's and i'm asking the context of principles essentially that the dao should follow that they are political appointees and the only qualification for the job and this was true for for the obamas ration is the work on the campaign. should that be allowed? >> look, i think you want to try to find talent where you can and try to match it up. there is the public affairs office. they actually do work for the people who are elected and they are answerable to them in the cases where they are political appointees. i was a political appointee. so i think i don't think you can change the whole sub inner
. thank you. gosh. here and then behind you. the lady here. next to sean. >> talk a little bit more about how marketplace pressures effect the work your organization does. years ago there was a campbell "newshour." today there's more instances of advertising perhaps mast raiding as journalism. >> trying to get us in trouble. [laughter] you ask about sponsor content and that kind of thing? >> just perhaps what challenges your organization has faced in keeping that at bay or trying to do something with it. >> well, for us we're a little bit different in a lot of organizations. we don't have advertisement. we don't have banner ads or popup ads things like that. the fizzment on our site is a sort of sponsored content. it's labeled as such as post sponsored by or written by corporation. and -- learning how to do things in term of how the advertisement are generally written and presented. mostly because we do viral marketing, you know, advertisements are done for the same way. weth way we get our story out in a way that quickly share them with each other. the advertisement done our site is simi
] >> thank you very much. my name is sean gray from the university. i was in russia for seven years. i would like to ask the panel a question about russia's future. i have seen my peers and the generation younger than me growing up in russia and i noticed that basically if they are smart and if they are liberals who are thinking they will try to leave the country and you mentioned silicon valley about how russia is one of the languages and they are very smart but unfortunately they are not looking to improve their country and the legal systems and so forth. then you see the other guys that are staying there and a lot of these nationalists and people like that who are going and protesting in the beating and stuff like that. others protests and then they are rising of taking positions in the government as well. that's the future in russia itself. he's not going to be around for very long and this is a question that always [inaudible] [laughter] >> sorry about that. [laughter] >> speaking as a member of the younger generation looking for work in the future i didn't mean to offend anybody. unfor
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8